Skip to main content

About your Search

20130211
20130219
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 16
WETA 9
KQED (PBS) 8
KPIX (CBS) 5
CSPAN 4
WJZ (CBS) 4
CSPAN2 3
FBC 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
WUSA (CBS) 3
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 67
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 67 (some duplicates have been removed)
front of technology. but to be really well educated and a specialist in any one of those things, requires a very deep immersion, deep immersion software or bioinfomatics or the various underlying sciences. and i wish i had had a better formal scientific education when i was younger. that more than anything would have helped me, i think. >> rose: here's you what said, my undergraduate degree was in history. i wish i would have been smart enough to excel in math, fitics-- physics or biology because the voyagers and adventurers come from there. >> that's where they start from. and yes, i don't quarrel with any part of that sentiment. i think those are today's voyagers. and they start off with a grounding in those particular sciences. >> rose: and do the business school grads become transactional people and go to wall street and go to financial institutions? >> it's obviously, charlie, unfair to paint a broad-brush here. and there's some very talented people who come out of the business schools. but-- and who join these companies. and a very vital parts of helping the companies get
to develop radiation. >> new things have to be sent into space. >> a lot of new things. the technology from that then goes out and stimulate the world economy like apollo and early space programs stimulated the economy of the world. i got an iphone on my hip that has 2000 times the memory of an apollo computer. can you imagine? the space station guys, they have texts, skype or something up there. and they're all on their laptops. it boggles your mind what is going on there technologically. >> today you could probably tweet what is going on on your flight. on your first and only flight, on the way back to earth, you got to do spacewalk. >> it was totally different. a different experience. as i described being on the moon, it contrasts the gray lunar surface with the blackness of space. people ask me what does the earth like from the moon? i said i cannot tell you because i landed in the center of the moon which took the earth directly overhead. in an apollo space suit, it is like being in a fishbowl. you move your head but the helmut does not move. so i did not get to see the earth very much
, and that is solar technology equipment, not just semiconductor equipment making. joe? >> yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, you're definitely seeing that transition. again, there's the appetite out there. we've seen it's been lagging up until this point. now we are seeing it's leading, and so now you see not just institutional money, but retail money coming in, and the numbers prove that. ashley: joe, cisco, what's the call? you say, look, they are trying to diversify away from the slower moving segments of the business and build momentum. you see that happening? >> yeah, you know what? the revenue stream traditionally from the routeing and switching, obviously, a slower pace revenue stream, getting into the i.t. platform servicing, the enterprise participants spending more, seeing the macro economic trends starting. the business right now has been performing well, and looking at the options marketplace, we're actually seeing there's potential of 5% move going into this number and into the end of expiration week, and we could see momentum going in through the springtime if, again, we see some solid numbers com
and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. we all work remotely so this is a big deal, our first full team gathering! i wanted to call on a few people. ashley, ashley marshall... here. since we're often all on the move, ashley suggested we use fedex office to hold packages for us. great job. [ applause ] thank you. and on a protocol note, i'd like to talk to tim hill about his tendency to use all caps in emails. [ shouting ] oh i'm sorry guys. ah sometimes the caps lock gets stuck on my keyboard. hey do you wanna get a drink later? [ male announcer ] hold packages at any fedex office location. >> neil: all that plastic foam and shove it? new york city mayor saying that plastic foam has to go, but is the n >>. >> neil: first it was size of drinks and now it is foam. mayor bloomberg pushing a ban on the popular foam on ordering something to go. charles says the ban has to go. >> you
spying directed at companies with ties to military technology, but energy, finance, and other industries have also been hacked over the past five years. senior correspondent john miller is a former fbi assistant director. john, good morning. how widespread? >> this is pretty widespread charlie. when you take an nie, national intelligence estimate this is really the consensus of all 16 intelligence agencies on a problem, so this is going to be a fairly authoritative document that's sounding the alarm that china -- well, picture this. two giant aircraft hangars full of military people who work 24/7 hacking into u.s. government databases, private corporation databases. >> you mean those are chinese hackers doing that. >> yes yes. and they're working for the government. these aren't guys doing it for entertaining. here's the difference. we do that too. all countries do that. the difference -- i think the alarm the report sounds is china does it not just for political and military secrets, they're stealing trade secrets to get china ahead. >>> obviously the
select-a-size. it's the smaller powerful sheet. the only one with trap + lock technology.tt>fd@mú<$-3w9"rsa8@éúy$%d@%7!< look! one select-a-size sheet of bounty is 50% more absorbentttxwlun+og#wvs#q)p0á)uog5u,qcf;us ,x9k8elsvíe'úspae3tz@5>o0 than a full size sheet of the leading ordinary brand.tt>f#@ad't?/iárrxúl[8(!4mhbl +rp use less. with the small but powerful picker upper, bounty select-a-size. >>> this is a kpix 5 news morning update. >>> good morning, it's 7:56. i'm michelle griego. a suspected car thief is dead after crashing a stolen suv during a police pursuit in south san jose. it happened late last night on blossom hill road near u.s. 101. he tried to start the chase when an man tried to run him down. >>> today is a day off for some workers. government offices, post offices libraries and banks and most schools, and garbage collection will go on as scheduled today. stay with us. traffic and weather in just a moment. ♪ [ music box: lullaby ] [ man on tv, indistinct ] ♪ [ lullaby continues ] [ baby coos ] [ man announcing ] millions are still
building new technologies. these are allowing profit margins to go off. that is why we consistently see 60-70% of companies beating estimates. s&p earnings can easily be 110. we have a long way to go in this market. connell: brian thank you very much. thank you for playing along with marshall. dagen: a majority of americans think we are still in a recession. something the president will have to think about going into tomorrow's state of the union address. connell: lawmakers work for a real reform to our immigration policies. a pretty good story on that coming up. before we get to all of that, here is a look at oil today. ♪ all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life upside down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i
gas, using the breathtakingly new technology that is allowing us to find both wet and dry gas, very valuable to our country, which is happening in many places in the country, to help fuel a renaissance of manufacturing. and madam president, this is not just going to help traditional oil and gas-producing states like louisiana and texas. this finding of natural gas, this breakthrough in technology enabling us to retrieve this gas in a -- not only an economically efficient way but in an environmentally sensitive way is going to be very important and impactful to many, many states in the union and is already we're seeing companies coming back, relocating from chile, from places in europe, from places in asia, coming back to the united states because of this resurgence of gas primarily. but here we're talking about a pipeline primarily from oil coming out of sands, not the traditional deep wells where you have large deposits of oil that you drill down into but a technology that's allowing the separation of these sands to get the carbon or the oil out of them to use. now, yes, we want to
. technology is changing the game. this dimg tal revolution is alive in almost every sector of society but not yet government. and governor, you understand this intimately. we still have this top-down hierarchical structure, and it's no longer increasingly relevant to the world everyone else is living in. so that's what the book begins to address. >> how do you harness -- >> exactly. >> -- how do you harness this incredible resource we have which is this new technology? because to some people it's about posting family photos and sending snarky tweets to each other. how do you use that for good? >> it's about a two-way conversation. i'm convinced of this, as a businessperson, i have about 1,000 employees in 15 businesses. we used to have one-way broadcast conversations. here's our product, take it or leave it. those days are over. it's a two-way conversation. it's the age of you. it's about customization, not standardization. and so that is a fundamental precept in terms of government reform. we've got to have that feedback loop. listening to the show this morning, it's distressing. fra
economics, aid, and technology. she enhanced the role of diplomatic and defense initiatives in the international arena. capitalizing on this effort, it she instituted a diplomacy and developmental review for the department that mirrored the defense review to all our endeavors. secretary clinton' success in the department of state resulted in an expanded role of global issues and greatly facilitated the respect of military groups on every continent. visiting more than 100 countries. she has been an exceptional example of the commitment to fostering better relations abroad and to directly supporting our troops in those areas. most noteworthy in her years of federal service, she has instantly and an advocate of all personal programs and initiatives that have enhanced the lives of military personnel and their families. her accomplishments reflect upon herself, the joint staff, and the department of defense. [applause] please be seated. ladies and gentlemen, the 23rd secretary of defense, leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you. what a great honor to be able to recognize this very
'll take you on a ride to see why new thinking and new technology could mean the return of air ships. that's all ahead. >>> right now it's time to show this morning's headlines. "the new york times" says the rising cost of health care is slowing and that helping it ease the deficit. the congressional budget office now estimates hundreds of billions of dollars have been cut from the cost of medicare and medicaid. overall, health care spending is at its lowest rate in decades. >>> the "washington post" looks at state of the union squatters. they are the lawmakers who wait hours to stake out one of the coveted aisle seats in the house chamber. being in that spot can mean some high-profile television face time when greeting the president. >>> the "wall street journal" says gum chewing is falling out of favor. gum makers are looking to win customers back. they're shrinking gum packages to fit in the pockets of jeans and are trying new flavors like orange cream pop and wild berry remix which i think might be part of the problem. i like just the traditional flavors. >>> "the financial times" says
. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology. quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. with time release smart control technology. hey! hey honey! hey alan. uh, hey.... i'm bob, we talked at the tax store. i did your taxes. i thout you were a tax expert? today, i'm a master plumber. major tax stores advertise for preparers with "no tax experience necessary." at turbotax, you only get answers from cpas, eas or tax attorneys - all real tax experts. ...than h&r block stores and all other major tax stores combined. because of a migraine. so they trust excedrin migraine to relieve pain fast. plus sensitivity to light, sound, even nausea. no wonder it's #1 neurologist recommended. migraines are where excedrin excels. neurologist recommended. don't miss the biggest... you won't run into deals this big just anywhere. rush into sears presidents day event. save up to 30% on appliances. this is worth running into. this is sears. just begin with america's favorite soups. bring out chicken broccoli alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to campbellskitchen.com for recipes, plus a valua
. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort ... individualized. at the ultimate sleep number event, queen mattresses start at just $599 . and save 50% on our innovative limited edition bed. >>> okay. check out this picture. this picture was taken december 21st, 2010. that's then house speaker nancy pelosi signing a bill that was passed by the house so it can be officially sent to the president's desk to become law. did you know that speaker of the house has to sign every bill passed by congress before the president does? that usually does not happen in a big public ceremony, but this time it did because what nancy pelosi is signing there is the official repeal of "don't ask, don't tell." on the far right of the picture you can see democratic senator barbara boxer of california. she was one of the chief proponents of repeal in the u.s. senate. on
dodge then we do have to cut back more. if it turns out we get another technology revolution like we did with the internet, then we have to cut back lessment i think it's fair to do a lot now but not too much, in 5, 7 years reevaluate where we stand. >> rose: but you want to get us on a growth trajectory. >> and i'm-- . >> rose: that is your primary goal. >> that is my primary goal, growth trajectory in a sustainable way, that doesn't lead to huge debt, doesn't depend on huge debt or inflation. >> rose: how different is what you propose from what bowles simpson was. >> actually not that different. i mean, i think one of the key things that came out of the bowles simpson discussion was the idea of what i call the simpson bowles ratio, that it's a question of how much is done through spending cuts versus tax increases. and bowls simpson said we want it 2 for -- two times as much spending for every tax increase. and i think, frankly, the obama administration is going to come out of these negotiations well above that floor. meaning there is going to be-- . >> rose: 3 to 1. >> i think between
mobilization to not shoes the campaign infrastructure the technology the sophistication they have and to build from the out side to really do things in that way, mobilize the outside game. i think that is what he believes is the path to progress. >> charlie. >> rose: yes, mark. >> i think the president is remarkably consistent and i think in a second term he's kind of a fixed piece. the big changes for me, there's a new chief of staff a new secretary of treasury new secretary of state new secretary of defense. how all these people fit together as big parts of saying how the operation works. and i think the biggest piece was also a constant in some ways but his role that's fluctuated is the vice president. you talked to members of congress even republicans particularly in the senate and they will say we just don't have contact with the president, we don't have a feel for the president to be able to move things or stick with the agenda. they have great confidence in the vice president and great confidence in the vice president's ability as he showed in the last couple deals at the end of these
when we move into the whole area of terrorism and counterterrorism and technologies that make it possible with a handful of individuals to destroy one of our cities then we're forced, i think, to think anew about our traditional ways of doing business, about how we make decisions, about how has the authity to make what decisions and that has, in fact, i think, probably generated is shift, if you will to the executive branch that the presidential authority is greater now than it was prior to 9/11. and basically for good reason. i don't always agree with the way it's used, but we felt an obligation to move aggressively along those lines. we didn't sit down and seiji we need more powers, we say how are we going to use the technical capability we have to intercept communication beeen al qaeda overseas and the people they're talking to here at home and what kind of authority do we need from the courts or from the congress. so we go through those exercises but i think it's driven by circumstance as much as it is by philosophy. >> rose: thank you. >> enjoyed it, charlie, good to see
's an example of the pebble watch that's been out for a while. we're seeing wearable technology finally break out. for apple to jump in there and take the lead in it kind of has a ring of authenticity to it. the fact that it would tie to the iphone means if they have a hit with a watch up to buy an iphone to work with it. keeps people in the camp which is a big apple strategy. >> what can you do with this watch? >> reporter: you think now that it's easy to carry your phone and use it but a lot of distraction and a drag. it would be nice to keep your phone in your pocket and have a lot of other things just show up on a watch like if a call is coming in you can see who it is, decide to take it right there on your bluetooth headset and not fumble with the phone and unlock it and power it on. >> i'll be darned. >> it's all on a watch. imagine if all your facebook or email alerts come in here. if you care about them you pull out the phone and go deeper. it's like a ticker of your life. a fascinating idea and it can be a fitness watch that monitors activity,
smart technology ceo out there, and obviously you are one of them, they all want to get on the cloud, there is going to be a lot of competition from big and small companies in your space. how do you compete with that and stay strong? >> well, we're unique in we use this thing called open source, the development model, only publicly traded open source development or company based on that model. we have been able to uniquely protect that, and so we'll continue to drive that forward. and it is unique and different. no one else is really competing in open source with us. cheryl: again, linux is a big piece of that. >> it is. but all of our software, storage solutions open source, nine of the ten all run on open source infrastructure. the cloud is really built on open source. cheryl: you're in the process of moving the company to raleigh, north carolina. what are the advantages of being in north carolina versus frankly being in other states that have higher taxes? >> well, sure, when we look, we have large development centers in boston, on the west coast, and our headquarters now in ralei
latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. thank you very much. [applause] thank you so much. oh, it's so great to be here, and, thank you, for that very generous and warm welcome. it's great to be back in savannah, one of the most beautiful cities in the entire world. i always enjoy coming here. i want to thank howard morrisson for that very kind introduction and we've had a chance to visit this morning, and howard and mary are great folks here and contribute so much to this community. congratulations to the savannah book festival in this sixth year. it keeps on getting better an
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 67 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)